.........................................ΕΛΛΑΔΑ - ΜΝΗΜΕΙΑ - Αρχαιολογικοί χώροι και Μνημεία στην Ελλάδα. Ελληνικός Πολιτισμός


«Όποιος ελεύθερα συλλογάται συλλογάται καλά», Ρήγας Φεραίος Βελενστινλής

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Δευτέρα, 6 Οκτωβρίου 2014

«Αρχαία Ελλάδα: Θεοί, το μεγαλείο και οι ζωντανοί μύθοι» τιτλοφορείται το θέμα – αφιέρωμα που φιλοξενεί το βρετανικό περιοδικό National Geographic Traveller και ξεναγεί τους αναγνώστες του στον Παρθενώνα και τους Δελφούς

     ΔΗΜΟΣΙΕΥΜΑ      

Ο Παρθενώνας και οι Δελφοί φιλοξενούνται στο αφιέρωμα
του βρετανικού National Geographic Traveller

Παρθενώνας & Δελφοί στις Χαμένες Πόλεις του National Geographic Traveller


Ο Παρθενώνας και οι Δελφοί φιλοξενούνται στο αφιέρωμα του βρετανικού National Geographic Traveller «Χαμένες πόλεις: οι πιο σημαντικοί αρχαίοι οικισμοί του κόσμου». «Αρχαία Ελλάδα: Θεοί, το μεγαλείο και οι ζωντανοί μύθοι» τιτλοφορείται το θέμα – αφιέρωμα που φιλοξενεί το βρετανικό περιοδικό National Geographic Traveller και ξεναγεί τους αναγνώστες του στον Παρθενώνα και τους Δελφούς.

Ο Μπεν Λέργουιλ ταξίδεψε στην Ελλάδα και περιέγραψε με γλαφυρότητα το ταξίδι του, από τη στιγμή που συναντά τον οδηγό ταξί που τον μεταφέρει στον Ιερό Βράχο και τις οδηγίες που του δίνει, μέχρι τη συνάντηση με την ξεναγό του, που τον μυεί στα μυστήρια της Πυθίας.

_____________________
«Σε μια εποχή που η Ευρώπη ακόμα ζούσε σε καλύβες, ο Περικλής έφτιαξε τους ψηλούς ναούς και τα κομψά αρμονικά κτίρια που μέχρι σήμερα εξάπτουν τη φαντασία».
Σκαρφαλωμένος στο βράχο της Ακρόπολης, ατενίζοντας την αρχαία Αγορά και τους χιλιάδες τουριστών που περνούν στα πόδια του, ο δημοσιογράφος σχολιάζοντας την «Χρυσή εποχή» του Περικλή, σημειώνει: «σε μια εποχή που η Ευρώπη ακόμα ζούσε σε καλύβες, ο Περικλής έφτιαξε τους ψηλούς ναούς και τα κομψά αρμονικά κτίρια που μέχρι σήμερα εξάπτουν τη φαντασία».
Όσο για τους Δελφούς, εντύπωση δεν κάνει μόνο στον δημοσιογράφο η ιστορία της Πυθίας, αλλά και το πρώην μεγαλείο του ίδιου του τόπου και αναφέρεται στα χιλιάδες αναθηματικά χάλκινα αγάλματα που πλαισίωναν τη διαδρομή προς τον κεντρικό ναό αλλά και το στίβο 180 μέτρων που κάθε τέσσερα χρόνια φιλοξενούσε τους Πανελλήνιους Αγώνες.
Το αφιέρωμα ολοκληρώνεται με οδηγίες για το πώς να έρθει κάποιος στην Ελλάδα, για διαμονή κτλ. Ενώ το περιοδικό στο ίδιο αφιέρωμα περιλαμβάνει τους πήλινους στρατιώτες του Ξιάν, στην Κίνα και την Πέτρα της Ιορδανίας.

FEATURES

Lost cities: The world’s greatest ancient settlements

Follow in the footsteps of some of the world’s greatest explorers and discover ancient settlements and lost cities. From Delphi in Greece to the Terracotta Warriors and the iconic Petra — they’re the stuff of travel legend

Lost Cities - the ruins of a theatre in Delphi, Greece
The ruins of a theatre in the ancient city of Delphi, Greece. Image: Getty.

Ancient Greece: Gods, grandeur & lasting legends

“You have to be quiet, and go into yourself,” says Thomas, my Greek taxi driver, accelerating hard through an amber traffic light. “That’s how to appreciate the ruins. Sometimes I stand there, and for a minute it’s like I’m in ancient times. I can see the colours and hear the crowds.”
During our drive into town, Thomas has also eulogised the Greek alphabet (“like a prayer to Apollo”) and shared his theory on how the country survived the economic crisis (“It was the light — the sun never abandoned us.”). As airport transfers go, it’s more thought-provoking than most. But then Greece is a one-off destination. I’m here to visit two of its key classical sites, beginning in the city that gave the world democracy. Modern-day Athens remains a singular sight, with the temple-topped crag of the Acropolis rising high above the souvlaki (grilled fast food) shops and market stalls of the streets below.
It’s almost 2,500 years since the celebrated statesman Pericles rebuilt the city after a series of wars with Persia and ushered in its so-called Golden Age. At a time when much of Europe was still scratching around in hovels, he commissioned the lofty temples and neatly proportioned buildings that still capture the imagination today.
The Parthenon is, of course, the best known of these, and when I climb the Acropolis to see it up close it’s a reminder of just how familiar its much-imitated columns have become. Its evolution from Greek temple into scaffold-clad tourist magnet has been eventful — it’s also seen service as a Byzantine church, Frankish cathedral, Turkish mosque and gunpowder store — but its earliest incarnation is the most evocative.
No less stirring is the view it grants of the city, radiating out to accommodate more than three million people. I look down on the ruins of the ancient Agora, the former heart of Athens, where Socrates, Plato and Aristotle held forth. The crumbled walls once formed libraries, shrines and fountain houses.
I head next into the foothills of Mount Parnassus, three hours north of Athens, to visit the archaeological site of Delphi. For a long time it was considered the centre of the world. “In legend, Zeus released two eagles from different ends of the earth to meet at its midpoint,” says my guide, Georgia. “They came together in the skies right here.”
The setting is a rousing one — huge limestone bluffs loom overhead, spring wildflowers nod, and the vast valley floor is blanketed in olive groves. It’s suitably momentous, given the site’s past. For over 1,000 years, leaders, dignitaries and warriors came to this remote spot to present offerings and ask questions of the Delphi oracle, a local woman who, it was believed, acted as the gods’ mouthpiece.
“It was usually a woman over 50,” explains Georgia, as we pick our way through the remains covering the hillside. “When one died, another local woman was always appointed. She sat on a golden tripod above a gap in the rocks that emitted vapours, and this gave her divine power. But scientists today think the gases were probably methane, ethane and ethylene. So really, she was high. And like all astrologers, her prophecies were always very ambiguous.”
If the spiritual validity of the oracle is easy to mock, there’s no doubting the former splendour of the site itself. Thousands of votive bronze statues once lined the route up to the main temple, whose pillars were topped with sculpted figures.
When Georgia leaves, I climb to the top of the site where, beyond clusters of pines, an ancient, 180 metre-long athletics arena sits under a cliff face. I’m alone. The arena was levelled in the fifth century BC and is still banked by stone seating. Delphi hosted the Panhellenic Games here every four years, when thousands thronged the stadium. I remember Thomas’s advice and, above the warm breeze, I try to hear the crowd.

MORE INFO

Suits: Travellers in search of a short-haul, world-class cultural break.
Details: discovergreece.comHow to do it: Travel Republic has a four-night break to Greece in mid-September from £431 per person, based on return flights with Aegean Airlines and two nights at the Herodion Hotel in Athens. Travel to, and accommodation in, Delphi is extra (it currently offers the Iniohos hotel in Delphi from £15 a night). travelrepublic.co.ukAlternative: At the western end of the Peleponnese, Olympia hosted the original Olympic Games every four years and still hangs heavy with atmosphere.


_____________
http://www.thetoc.gr/taksidia/article/parthenwnas--delfoi-stis-xamenes-poleis-tou-national-geographic-traveller
http://edstellados.blogspot.gr/
http://natgeotraveller.co.uk/smart-travel/features/lost-cities-discover-worlds-greatest-ancient-settlements/

Δεν υπάρχουν σχόλια:

Δημοσίευση σχολίου